Original Strength https://originalstrength.net/blog/ en Copyright 2020 by . All Rights Reserved. 120 Grandma’s Wisdom https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/30/grandma’s-wisdom/ We’ve all heard the stories of how a grandmother has lifted a car off of a child, or how a man has picked up a tractor off of a friend. We’ve heard stories like this because they happen. In emergencies, when the action of another is needed at the most, people can respond in extraordinary, superhuman ways. They can do the impossible. 

 

Have you ever noticed that most of the heroic stories involve “ordinary” people.

 

Or people that have never trained to do such amazing feats?

 

What I mean is, those grandmothers that do the impossible, they didn’t train for the impossible. They didn’t spend years exercising, trying to get stronger. They didn’t practice lifting heavy things, they didn’t worry about missing a day at the gym, and they probably never sat around mentally rehearsing superhuman feats. No, they were just there, in the moment that called for them to respond. And, they responded.

 

So I have a weird question: If an “ordinary” grandmother can pick a car off a child, if a friend can leverage a tractor off a neighbor, do you think we need to lift weights to be strong enough to enjoy our lives? Or, do you think our bodies are actually strong enough to do anything we want them to do, we just need to know how to access that strength? 

 

Here’s where I’m leaning - all the strength you need is inside of you. You may not know how to access it, but that doesn’t mean its not there. Your nervous system has placed restrictions on your strength. But what if you could allow your nervous system to relax those restrictions so you could express your strength freely? 

 

Maybe there are clues in the stories of superhuman feats. Most of these stories are reported around an emergent need, life or death for the person trapped or pinned under an object. So the heroes, the grandmothers, responded in a moment of need. A moment was needed. The grandmother was not stuck in the past thinking of all the times she tried to move heavy things and could not. She was not trapped in the future’s fear of “what if I can’t move this car.” She was there, in the moment, without a thought, but with a heart. In the moment, she was there with utmost clarity of the need and a desire to act. 

 

In these stories there are no tales of waiting for others to arrive for help, there are no tales of mental and physical preparation. There are only tales of “Well, I’m here right now.” 

 

What if the way for us to unlock our full potential was to be present in the moment, without the noise of our thoughts, our memories, and our fears? What if simply being alert to the moment allowed our nervous system to feel safe enough to let us freely move and express our strength? Sure, an urgent situation will produce a hormonal cascade in the body that may help with this strength, but the the presence of the moment is what puts it to affective use. After all, most peoples’ thoughts cause the same hormonal cascades of an emergency, but their thoughts also make their nervous system feel unsafe; thus the hormonal cascade.

 

I think we are all more than strong enough to live our lives very well, to do what needs to be done and to do what we want to do. But often we get stuck in our heads, our beliefs, our fears, and our doubts. What if we could get out of our heads, our thoughts, and get into our moments? What if our moments were the key to living with unbridled strength, creativity, and compassion? 

 

I don’t know. I’m just thinking out loud to you...But when I think of those heroic, amazing stories, it makes me ponder our ways. Right now, your body is strong enough to pick up a car. That sounds amazing, but you’re amazingly strong. We all are. Grandma proves that. 

 

Maybe that’s Grandma’s message for us: “Baby, yaw need to get out of your heads, get into your hearts, and respond to your moments. It’s the only way yaw’ll be free to express your potential.”  

 

“Oh, one more thing, you know there’s no such thing as ‘ordinary’ people.” 

 

Yes ma’am. Thanks Grandma.

 

]]>
Mon, 30 Nov 2020 03:08:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/30/grandma’s-wisdom/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
82 Is The New 42 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/17/82-is-the-new-42/ "I’d just like to say I am a good friend in New Zealand of Patti Lien, who shared with me about Original Strength and then “ by chance “ I came across one of Tim's podcasts.

I began a few basic things on my bed, .....didn’t do anything on the floor because I couldn’t physically get down on the floor and couldn’t get up even with the help of a chair.  I did have a try at first and the whole thing was a DRAMA!

A year later I can get up off the floor without an aid!  To me that’s a miracle.....and/or proof that these things work. I’m 82, overweight (urgh), but I am more agile than I have been for 30/40 years.  Mind you....I'm perhaps not the most elegant getting to stand up (not at all like Tim)!!      

To me, it's almost unbelievable I could go from being totally cast on the floor, unable to get up without someone helping me.......to getting up unaided.

I “happened“ on a podcast last week of Tim’s about the pelvic diaphragm.....and have added those exercises too. Half my friends have prolapses.....so I am being proactive to keep things right!!   I haven't lost any weight though, like the person you wrote about..... But I have changed shape a tiny bit!

Cheers and God bless you all...."

Kaye, New Zealand

]]>
Tue, 17 Nov 2020 19:35:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/17/82-is-the-new-42/ jill@originalstrength.net (Jill Greene)
Standing Strong https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/16/standing-strong/ How are you doing? 

I’m asking because this has been one heck-of-a year. One for the record books. It’s had Covid, Stress, Election, Fear, Anger, Depression, Hurricanes that ran out of names, Lock Downs, Riots, Protests, Hate, and Uncertainty.

There’s so much more.

Like you, I’ve also had tons of wild personal “mess” to deal with this year, too. It’s as if the Bucket of All Chaos has been kicked over and all it’s contents have spilled all over the world. It’s just A LOT to deal with, or process, or navigate. It might be all you can do to just keep your head up. That may even seem impossible at times. 

During this Season of Uncertainty I have learned a great deal - mostly about myself.

I’ve learned I have absolute zero control over anything but me. Unfortunately, I’ve also learned the control I have over myself, my thoughts, my actions, even my breath seem as if I’m trying to ride a bucking bull with baby oil all over it’s back. In other words, I’ve learned that I’m a lot to handle. But I am learning to know myself, to handle myself, to be patient with myself, to forgive myself often and to be compassionate towards myself. 

There are times when my thoughts get the best of me. There are times when my actions are reactions. And there are times when I miss the mark of how I want to be. And, all that’s Ok. After all, I am human. I’m not only human, but I am human. 

Anyway, this year as wild as it is, is becoming the magnifying glass over my life. It’s offering me clarity over who I am and how I am.

It’s teaching me the healing power of a breath and It’s also teaching me the wisdom of the Serenity Prayer:

God grant me the wisdom to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things that I can; and the wisdom to know the difference...

Acceptance - there’s a life-changing word. It’s the opposite of resistance, the one word I’m really good at. 

What I’m learning is that I can grow from acceptance and I can suffer from resistance.

Suffering violates Principle #1: It feels good to feel good. It also boogers up Principle #2: Make the hard things easy. Who wants to make suffering easy? That’s a trap, by the way.

As I was saying, the events of this year are giving me clarity over who I am and how I am being. More specifically, I’m learning when I am standing versus when I am running, when I am responding versus when I am reacting. Being aware of these states is helping me navigate through the uncertain events of the year. 

Theres so much more I can say about this but you’re going to quit reading soon, after all, the Bucket of All Chaos is still spilling over.

So, as I have done for 40+ years, when I’m tormented I read scriptures. It just always seems to help, to know that others have been where I am. When I first wrote Becoming Bulletproof, I somehow gravitated towards Ephesians 6: 8-13, it’s about putting on “The Armor of God.” 

Recently, I decided to “Timmy” it, to make it more digestible for where I was at. It is comforting to me. Perhaps it will be to you as well: 

Rest in the protection of Love, that you may be able to stand and be steady in the chaotic day, and having done all you can to stand, continue to be still and know that Love is with you.

Be still. Anchor yourself in truth. Protect the innocence of your heart so that you may walk in peace wherever you go. Above all else, trust Love. Know that you are His and that He has put His spirit in you. Be mindful always of the Spirit that is in you.

Keep your head up, guys. And keep standing. You’re not alone. You’re never alone. 

 

 

]]>
Mon, 16 Nov 2020 02:45:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/16/standing-strong/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
BuiltLean Podcast: How To Restore Your Childhood Mobility https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/14/builtlean-podcast-how-to-restore-your-childhood-mobility/ Click Here to listen to podcast.

Tim joins Marc Perry, creator of BuiltLean Transformation on November 12, 2020 to discuss How To Restore Your Childhood Mobility.

Articles » Exercise » Recovery & Rehab
November 11, 2020

What You’ll Learn

  1. Top 5 exercises to “reset” your bodies health
  2. How proper breathing can restore your mobility
  3. How to make hard exercises easy
  4. Why aging does not mean getting stiff
  5. Tim’s daily exercise routine

Listen Now

Listen on SpotifyGoogle Podcasts, and Apple Podcasts.

Helpful Links

About Tim Anderson

Tim has been a personal trainer for over 20 years. He is an accomplished author and speaker and is known for streamlining complex ideas into simple and applicable information. He is passionate about helping people realize they were created to be strong and healthy.

Tim has written and co-written many books on this subject including Becoming BulletproofHabitual StrengthPressing RESET, and Original Strength. When it comes down to it, his message is simple yet powerful: We were created to feel good and be strong throughout life.

Transcript

Marc Perry:
Hey guys, welcome to the BuiltLean podcast. I’m Marc Perry, the creator of BuiltLean, which helps busy man with demanding careers get lean, strong and functionally fit with exceptional vitality. And today, I have a very special guest with me, Tim Anderson, and Tim is the founder of Original Strength, which teaches health, fitness and education professionals, a system to restore, build, and enhance the movement of their patients, clients and athletes. And as a movement restoration specialist, Tim has written and co-written several books, including ‘Becoming Bulletproof,’ ‘Habitual Strength,’ ‘Pressing Reset,’ and ‘Original Strength.’ And I came across Tim years ago and even wrote an ‘Original Strength’ book review on builtlean.com website many years ago. And Tim is lean, he’s strong, he’s fit, he’s flexible, and he’s achieved a level of fitness I personally aspire to, and he’s able to move his body so effortlessly and fluidly, literally like a child. You’ve got to see it to believe it. And Tim is a phenomenal teacher. In fact, he’s a teacher to the teachers. And so with that said, Tim, thank you so much for joining the BuiltLean podcast today.

Tim Anderson:
Marc, thank you so much for having me, this is awesome. Thank you.

Marc Perry:
Cool, so I guess to start out, if you could kinda tell me a little bit more about the genesis of ‘Original Strength,’ how did it all come about?

Tim Anderson:
Well, it was a complete accident, I was dealing with overuse injuries from being over zealous with everything I’ve ever done, all types of training, mostly what set me off though was back in 2006, I really dove hard into kettlebell training. And my rule was, well, just show up anyway and just push through, push through, push through. It turns out that’s not the best rule to have. So I got overuse injuries, I got frustrated with them. So I looked in corrective exercises, so I started learning about how to fix myself and the more I learned, the more frustrated I got then because it felt like I was chasing my tail; like if I thought I was fixing something, something else would pop up.

Marc Perry:
Right.

Tim Anderson:
And I just got into this cycle. And then one night I was having a self-pity party, ’cause my whole life, even as an adult, I’ve always loved Superman. I wanted to be Superman, and I was sitting around one night just thinking that this sucks. I don’t feel like Superman. So I just honestly, I asked God to show me how to train to be bulletproof, and within two weeks, I picked up a book on learning disorders and children, and God just connected the dots and I just saw how wonderful the human design is, and how it’s… The body’s made to heal. It’s made to be strong, always. So that’s really how all this started.

Marc Perry:
So this is really fascinating and let’s dive in a little bit, so what do you mean by the body is designed to be strong, designed to heal, that sort of thing?

Tim Anderson:
So you know when… Do you have children?

Marc Perry:
I don’t, but many of the listeners do.

Tim Anderson:
Okay, so… But you’ve seen a child?

Marc Perry:
Of course, I have seen a child, I have nieces and nephews.

Tim Anderson:
So when a baby is born, when you were born, when I was born, we were all born with an original movement program, an original operating system, and in that program is the developmental sequence, and we’re designed to go through a series of movements that build our nervous system and tie our body together. And the purpose of that is, is to get us strong and resilient so that we can go and explore the world and live and enjoy life. So no matter how old we are, we have that program in us. My point to that though is, is we have a program that’s designed to make us strong; what we don’t have is a program that’s designed to make us weak and break us down, and we never lose the program that’s designed to make us strong. And there is no a program to make us weak, except for this right here. We can program ourself with our thoughts and everything, but we do not have… There’s nothing in our nervous system that has a date of expiration on it, that says, “Alright, let’s start tearing things down here,” that doesn’t exist. So at any time in your life, you can tap back into your original operating system and your body just starts laying down that solid foundation of strength again. That’s kinda how it works.

Marc Perry:
So how do you do that?

Tim Anderson:
You move like you did when you were a child. So when a child… In the developmental sequence, in ‘Original Strength,’ we teach five movements; breathing with the diaphragm properly… I mean, everybody breathes with their diaphragm, but to use it fully to its functionally. Then we do learning head control, how to master the movements of your eyes and your head, because you need to activate your vestibular system. And then rolling around on the floor, just like children do, rocking back and forth on your hands and knees just like children do, and then crawling. And crawling, you could also extend that out to walking, marching, skipping, running, but it’s the gait pattern though, and if we do those five things, we’re effectively pressing Reset on our bodies and telling our… Strength in our nervous system, telling our nervous system we are safe, giving it great information, where it feels safe to allow us to move.

Marc Perry:
And so I’m kind of thinking from this from different perspectives, on one hand, someone might be listening and be like, “Well, dude, I just wanna work out and get some abs or just get strong, get fit.” How does this fit in? Or what would you say to someone who thinks that?

Tim Anderson:
So if you love working out and lifting weights, or whatever your workout is, the better foundation you have for movement, the better you’ll be able to work out and enjoy the things you love to do. So if you have a solid movement foundation and you get that when you move how you were designed to move, by engaging in those five things that I was telling you about, now, yes, they are the developmental sequence, but yes, you’re actually supposed to engage in them in your entire life; you’re always supposed to breathe properly, you’re always suppose to activate your vestibular system, you’re always supposed to engage in your gait pattern, that should never stop. And that is what gives us a solid foundation for movement. And when we have that foundation, that means we can move any way we want to effortlessly with full strength, full expression of mobility, flexibility, stability, ’cause they all dance together. It’s just all expression. So however you wanna express yourself, whether it’s CrossFit, whether it’s body building, whatever it is, you can express yourself better and optimally, if you have your solid foundation of movement.

Marc Perry:
That’s great. And so I’m kind of curious to ask, what does your own exercise routine look like?

Tim Anderson:
Now? Today? I have come to a point in my life where I don’t really like… I don’t exercise anymore, I just… I move a lot.

Marc Perry:
Okay.

Tim Anderson:
Most days I wrote a book called ‘Discovering You’ where I go through this morning program of 21 repetitions of certain movements, I do that every day, I just call it the 21s. And I do a lot of body weight stuff, if I were gonna look at exercises that I really love to do, Hindu squats, Hindu push-ups, I hang from a bar a lot throughout the day, I do… Right now, I practice hand stands, but I just explore and play. I don’t really… I haven’t lifted weights in a very, very long time.

Marc Perry:
Wow. Okay.

Tim Anderson:
So in this season of my life, that’s what I’m exploring right now.

Marc Perry:
Okay, and I was… And this is a big question and it’s… You kinda talked a little bit about this in your answer… How has your routine evolved… Let’s just even call it in the last five years, how has your routine evolved? And we’re always evolving. I know my routine has dramatically evolved, I just wanna hear about you.

Tim Anderson:
In the last five years well, so ever since OS… So I would say it’s really the last 10 years, ’cause even five years ago, I was, when I trained inside of OS, like say, crawling, I would make crawling as miserable as I possibly could.

[laughter]

Marc Perry:
Right. Well, you did do a mile on YouTube, which is amazing, people could check that out, and that’s something that I watched back in the day. But anyway, continue.

Tim Anderson:
So five years ago, I might, would crawl across the football field.

Marc Perry:
Right.

Tim Anderson:
Three or four times, dragging 100 pounds of chains or something like that, you know, and I would do those kind of things, whereas now, my motto is, it feels good to feel good and make the hard things easy. So the thing about making hard things easy though is once you realize you have the ability to shut the mind down and just enjoy the suffering, where it’s not suffering anymore, you no longer really have to physically try to make hard things easy because really, it’s the mind that you wanna get control of. So I don’t really train hard anymore, but if I want to, every now and then, I’ll be like, “I wonder if I can still do battling ropes for 10 minutes?” and I might not have touched it in two years, but then I can just do 10 minutes consecutive of making waves on a rope with nasal breathing because though, not because I’m special, but just because I’ve learned how to not… I already know I can make hard things easy, so it’s like this just mindset when you go into it that you’ve done this before.

Tim Anderson:
You’ve done it 100 times, even though you haven’t done it in years, it’s still there, which is kind of neat, but a lot of that though, plays into reflexive strength, being able to manage your diaphragm, breathing properly, functionally, under stress, having a very good efficient movement foundation. So, the more efficient you can move, the easier things are, so even though you’re doing harder things, they’re not necessarily that hard, because you have, all your gaps are filled in.

Marc Perry:
So I was gonna ask you, how do you make hard things easy and quiet your mind? How do you make that shift?

Tim Anderson:
So my favorite way now, in today’s world, this season, I love crawling in super, super slow motion for time, like say, my phrase is “Make sloths jealous”, but I might go for, I like… I’m a fan of 10-minute blocks of challenges like that and I’ll just crawl… And I collect dust for 10 minutes, while I’m controlling, trying to control every fine movement in my body. And so you kinda… Your mind’s gotta… You have something to focus on and it just kind of drowns out the rest of the noise, so it becomes easy.

Marc Perry:
By the way, that’s so fascinating. And just for people listening, crawling is an amazing pattern, it’s something I actually… I learned from Tim, and I’ve built into my own training and warm up, but it’s tremendously challenging to do it slow, as he’s saying. It’s just a different level. And I’m gonna include some videos on the article, so I’m going to kind of include this kind of interview we’re doing on the article, just so you can see how unbelievable… It’s really… It’s amazing to see you do it, to be frank, to see how controlled and fluid it is, so I appreciate that.

And by the way, just as a personal note, from crawling forwards and backwards, and you were the one who kind of… I started learning about backward crawling and I realized how unbelievably hard it is, and I’ve actually… I had this one triathlete who I trained a while ago, and he was smoked… Just crawling backwards and forwards with just some jumping jacks, but anyways, just going backwards and forwards, crawling, I could do a one arm, one leg push up without too much trouble. It’s like, alright, not that big of a deal. Whereas before, it just seemed like a silly, ridiculous, it’s like, “How could you possibly do that?” Right.

Tim Anderson:
So that’s the great thing about crawling, is it ties your body together so well, I didn’t even… I could not do a one arm, one leg push up until I started crawling, and then I just discovered I could do it by accident, and it was a great discovery, and then I learned that… Well, heck, everything else I wanna do in the weight room is so much easier now too. So it really takes the breaks off of your strength and allows you to fully express yourself.

Marc Perry:
That’s really cool. And that’s in line with the Core X concept, which I learned from you. Right?

Tim Anderson:
Yeah, yeah, ’cause your body is an X, and when we do that crawling pattern, and when we crawl a certain way, like maintaining the optimal posture like a child does, it just really ties the X together, connects the shoulders to the hips, solid center, so that you can really create force and transfer force very efficiently through your body.

Marc Perry:
Okay. Cool. And so, in the ‘Original Strength’ book, you mentioned how you do not advocate the use of foam rollers or stretching. Why not?

Tim Anderson:
Well, I am pro, you can do it, if you like. If it brings you joy. If it brings you joy.

Marc Perry:
Okay.

Tim Anderson:
But if you’re doing it to try to fix a problem, it might not be the best route to go. Okay, like if you have a trigger point, instead of addressing the trigger point, it might be better to address the reason you have a trigger point, and the reason you might have a trigger point is because your nervous system is not getting optimal information and is compensating somehow, and it’s showing up as a trigger point. Whereas, so a foam roller, while it could feel good and could give you relief and help you perform a little bit, maybe it could be a temporary solution, if you haven’t addressed what your nervous system is really looking for. Now, if you love foam rolling, and it is something that brings you joy, great and do it. Our original one, when we first wrote the book, it was though, if you’re foam rolling every day and you’ve been foam rolling every day for a year and it still hasn’t fixed the issue that you’re foam rolling, it’s probably not working for you the way you want it to, and now it’s become a ritual, and you’re not really getting what you want out of it.

Marc Perry:
Okay, and so a question I have also is, does strength training with weights interfere with your body’s ability to be mobile and to restore your original function?

Tim Anderson:
Not if you have a solid foundation. Now, so if your body’s tied together, well, no, strength training with weights is just, it becomes an activity you can enjoy and express yourself wonderfully with, but if you don’t have a solid foundation, it can set you up for other issues, for injuries and things like that, so it could be a detriment to you. The easiest way I can explain that is, so powerlifters are very, very, very good at three lifts. Super strong at the squat, the bench press, and the deadlift. And so you could have a power lifter, let’s just say he pulls 700, 800 pounds from the ground. That’s amazing strength. But if he can’t walk up and down his steps without doing the hand rail, putting his hands on his knees because he hurts where he can’t move well and efficiently, is his strength really applicable or helpful in the real world, or is it only good for the deadlift and the squat? And that’s temporary, but living your life well into your 90s being able to walk up and down your own stairs with ease, that should be the big goal.

Tim Anderson:
So powerlifting is not bad for you, on top of a solid foundation, but if you don’t have that solid foundation and you just grew those three patterns, then… So, you’re weight training, then you could be setting yourself up for non-optimal movement, which could end up taking away more and more and more of your mobility, your flexibility, and your range of motion.

Marc Perry:
Okay, well, I think that… It’s all great stuff, Tim. And I was just… I’m thinking about kind of like a hypothetical case study. Let’s just take a guy, he’s 40 years old, he’s pretty stiff, he’s [16:39] ____ work on a computer most of the day. Shoulders are stiff, hips are stiff, and he’s just feeling, overall, he just has tightness. So where does he start? What does he do?

Tim Anderson:
Well, without seeing him, my first guess would be, the great place to start, would be his breathing.

Marc Perry:
Okay.

Tim Anderson:
Chances are if he’s sitting at a desk all day, he’s likely breathing up… Especially with the tightness issues that you were talking about, he’s likely breathing with his accessory breathing muscles, he’s likely breathing through his mouth, not his nose, he’s likely not resting his tongue on the roof of his mouth. So just those simple things could be what really restores his shoulder mobility, takes the tight tension out of his hamstrings, takes the pain out of his low back, just by changing how he breathes and how he holds his tongue. And it could be that simple ’cause it’s all about restoration, and it’s just engaging in that original program, it’s like a Reset button, and then all of a sudden, all the other programs on top of the original program just aren’t working the way they’re supposed to.

Marc Perry:
That’s fascinating. So why… I’m almost thinking, how does someone implement that… How do you implement these different types of breathing exercises? Where do you start?

Tim Anderson:
So, that’s tricky…

[laughter]

Tim Anderson:
The good news is, everybody’s done it before when you were a child, so your nervous system remembers how to do it, you just… But now, because of neuroplasticity and we’re trying to dust off old connections and remake other new connections efficient, we just have to show up. So it might be that we bring the awareness of the breath to the person first and show them how it works, right? Because here’s a cool thing: Change happens in the body at the speed of the nervous system, so just learning how to breathe with 10 good breaths is gonna totally change how his body moves.

Marc Perry:
I’ve seen it.

Tim Anderson:
Just like at the snap of a finger because it’s that fast. So once he understands that, ’cause he feels it in the experience… Experience is the best teacher ever. So when you experience how these movements can change your body that fast, well, now we have a reason to show up. So then we just show up every day for maybe two to five minutes, and we just start accumulating reps by showing up, we’re just consistent. So we do the same thing we did as a child, child shows up every day, has nothing else to do, so it shows up day in, day out, and it’s moving and living through those movements.

So as an adult, if we just show up every day and be patient, just like we did as a child, day in, day out, we’re gonna start accumulating those repetitions in our nervous system, and our nervous system is gonna say, “You know what, I really do remember how to do this and you don’t have to think about anymore. I got it. You’re gonna move well, I feel safe, I feel good. You’ve given me good information, I’m gonna let you move, Johnny.” And then Johnny’s moving happy as he wants to be, just like he did when he was a child.

Marc Perry:
That’s fascinating. And is this like five, 10 minutes a day? Are we talking crocodile breathing? Are we talking… I know I’ve seen… You’ve done breathing in kinda the rocking pattern. How do you go about doing this?

Tim Anderson:
It could be crocodile breathing. So at OS, when we teach workshops, we show all these different positions, and then we have you test which one your body really likes.

Marc Perry:
Oh wow.

Tim Anderson:
So once you know what your body really likes, great, let’s go with that. And because that one can start to fill in the gaps of all those other positions without you even trying to worry about those other positions, because we just wanna get the reps in where we’re successful, where the body says, “Oh yeah, I’ve… This… I’m gonna… This feels great. I’m gonna, I remember how to do this.” So it’s not… And here’s… The trick is, is we’re all individual, we all have different backgrounds and histories and things that are in our bodies, right? So the position for you may be different from me, that… Your [20:45] ____ position.

Marc Perry:
Interesting. Okay.

Tim Anderson:
And that’s fine, because we just wanna meet the person where they’re at, give them what their body needs, and then… So once we find that position… And it’s not hard to find, it’s not hard to find at all, then they… We just… Then it can just be five minutes a day getting in those reps, accumulating those reps and breathing in, in that position. And see what happens, though, is is you become mindful of your breath, eventually. So instead of just practicing that five minutes in the morning, when you’re on your way to work, you find yourself practicing with your tongue and with your mouth, breathing in and out your nose, down into your belly. When you’re sitting at your desk, you catch yourself. And so, as we build our practice, mindfulness also seeps in, so now you got two things that are accelerating the process. And then eventually, one day you just notice that, “Well, dang, I don’t even have to think about this anymore, I breathe the way I’m supposed to. And I’m always… I feel good. My back doesn’t… My back hasn’t hurt in weeks, holy cow!” So it just… Or, “Man, I can stand on one foot and put my shoes on again, that’s crazy. All I’ve been doing is practicing breathing and moving my head a certain way.”

Marc Perry:
It’s amazing.

Tim Anderson:
Huge things start happening. And it just makes life better.

Marc Perry:
Right. And so I just wanna add something on for the people listening. So I’ve done the Functional Movement Screen for years on different people, and there’s that hurdle step where someone has to lift up their leg and then go over a hurdle. And some guys are all over the place. And we do… I do crocodile breathing, and all of a sudden, it’s like their bodies move perfectly, you’re like, “What the heck just happened?” And so I guess what I’m saying is I think some of the people listening would be like, “Dude, breathing? This sounds so out there,” but until you see it, until you see it, you don’t bel… And I’ve seen it, I’ve seen how it just changes the game. And anyways, what were you gonna say?

Tim Anderson:
So, here’s why that works. So the diaphragm’s a spinal stabilizer. So if you’re using your diaphragm properly, that means you’re stabilizing your spine. Well, if your body knows your spine’s stable and it’s not gonna get hurt, it’s probably gonna let you move. But if… The body is crazy smart, but if it knows you’re not, you’re not stabilizing your spine, ’cause you’re breathing up in your neck and your chest, and you’re not using your diaphragm properly, your nervous system knows it. So now it’s not going to let you move with grace and ease, and it’s gonna make you wobble around and stuff, because it’s unsure about what you’re trying to do. And it’s gonna try to give you compensations, so that you can achieve the task. So instead of being able to step over it without any hitch in your giddy-up when everything’s level, you’re all over the place, because now you got compensations going on, because you don’t have a stable spine, and your nervous system is just trying to help you out.

Marc Perry:
That’s an amazing answer. I never even… I hadn’t heard that before. That’s great. And so let’s just say… Okay, once someone is able to reconnect with their breath and diaphragmatically breathe. And I’ve certainly seen a lot of guys, when I’ve done posture assessments, you breathe straight into your chest versus kind of diaphragmatically. And so I guess my question is, okay, once you have the diaphragmatic breathing down, and you’re kind of restored your breathing pattern, if you will, then what? What’s the next step?

Tim Anderson:
Well, there can be a next step or it could just be everything at once. So we breathe with our diaphragm, that’s the first thing a child does when it comes into the world, right? And that’s really important, ’cause it’s also the last thing you’re gonna do when you leave. But the other thing, the next thing, like if we were looking at the developmental sequence… And there’s no order to any of this stuff, but if you’re just looking at the sequence, would be head control, activating the vestibular system. And for an adult, that may just be… An easy way to think of it would be, “Hey, eyes and head on the horizon often,” because that’s how we’re designed. We don’t live that way…

[chuckle]

Marc Perry:
Interesting.

Tim Anderson:
But that’s how we’re designed. And getting up and down from your chair, often instead of sitting eight hours a day… Activate your vestibular system, tell your body you need it by moving, getting up, getting down, don’t be static, really easy ways to activate your vestibular system or to integrate the movements of the eyes and the head, just like a child does. So you wire your early… I mean, that’s how we’re wired. So where the eyes and the head go, the body follows. So you just start sharpening those reflexes you had as a child, and you make them efficient through use. And then the body just starts working the way it’s supposed to.

Marc Perry:
And so you’re mentioning some of these exercises, like the head nods, kinda rolling, rocking, crawling. And I imagine you’ve chosen those exercises, ’cause that’s what essentially, how babies develop their movement. Is that right? Is…

Tim Anderson:
Yeah, that’s… Those are the movements that make a baby strong enough to get up on two feet and go play on a playground or do whatever babies wanna do, right? It gives them the strength to fill their curiosity so they can get from here to there and just start discovering the world. Truth is, is as an adult, we should still have that same curiosity and wanna go discover the world, and we should still be moving the same way we did as a child. None of the… So our design… We’re clearly designed to move because movement is what builds the nervous system and keeps the brain healthy, which means we’re not designed to sit still, because if movement keeps the brain healthy and builds the nervous system and ties the body together, than that would clearly mean that not moving doesn’t do any of those things, it actually does the reverse. So, when we create a demand on the body, the body meets the challenge. When there is no demand, there’s nothing to meet, so it just lets everything go.

So if we ask nothing of our body, it will give us what we ask for, it gives us nothing. So then all of a sudden, if we’ve sat for… Say, we’ve sat for 10 years behind the desk, and then one day, our old high school buddy calls us up and we reminisce and think we want to get together for a flag football game one weekend, why would we think we would perform well since we haven’t asked our body to do any of that stuff for years? But we’re gonna go do it anyway, ’cause that’s how we are, and it’s fun, but we’re likely gonna get an injury because nothing’s tied together well. We don’t have good posture, we don’t breathe right, we can’t generate power and explosive-ness, and we can’t make turns anymore because we just haven’t accessed those, we’ve never asked our body to do that. But if we live in our design, we’re always asking our body, telling our body we wanna use it, and it knows and it’s gonna let us use it. It’s really about showing up.

Marc Perry:
So what would you say to someone… There’s certainly a lot of people who believe this, which I think is a limiting belief, but it’s a belief people are like, “Hey, you know what, you get stiffer as you get older.” What would you say?

Tim Anderson:
I would say you’re absolutely right…

Marc Perry:
Okay.

Tim Anderson:
If you believe that.

Marc Perry:
Interesting.

Tim Anderson:
But then you could go, “Why, why do we get… ” So you look at all the data, you can start looking at, well, we lose is what? 8%, 10% muscle mass after age 30, every… There’s some percentage that we lose every year. Well, what are we looking at? We’re looking at the current population. And what’s the current population doing? They’re not using their body. So yes, those numbers are probably very accurate, but they’re also looking at a sedentary body, a mass population of sedentary bodies that all are not supposed to be sedentary, they’re just not using their bodies. But what if a man is in his 60s and he never stopped using his body, he’s gonna be able to perform close to what he did in his 30s, he just is, because he never stopped creating the demand, he never told his brain, “Hey, I don’t wanna use my body anymore,” he always shows up. That’s why you see some people that are so healthy and they look great in their old age, but the secret is, is they’ve always been moving, they’ve not just decided to get still one day and sit in a chair for eight to 13 hours a day. And we’re gonna have to sit in chairs, but we don’t have to stay in them.

[chuckle]

Marc Perry:
Right, it creates that kind of inflexible cycle, it’s like an inflexibility cycle, it’s like, okay, you feel stiff or you sit down, then you feel stiff and then you don’t wanna move, and then it’s just that kind of inflexibility cycle. Right?

Tim Anderson:
What if also, you do believe that, “Well, once you get over 30, things start falling apart”? If you believe that, you’re gonna set your mind on that and you’re gonna accept it, you’re not gonna do anything to… You’re not gonna do a lot to try to reverse it, ’cause you’re already thinking, “Well, that’s just the way it is.” And the crazy thing about the brain though is, so the body is made to follow the head, and that’s true, very true in movement, but it’s also true in mind. Everybody knows whatever you set your mind on, you can achieve, which also means whatever you set your mind on, you’re gonna end up having. It works both ways.

[laughter]

You can set your mind on positive things and go get it. Whether you think you can or you can’t, you’re right. You’ve heard that before. Well, it works in the other way too, ’cause if you’re not thinking one thing or if you’re thinking something, that means you’re not thinking something else, and if you’re not thinking something else, that means you’re thinking something. So you’re going in that direction all the time.

Marc Perry:
Right. How old are you, Tim?

Tim Anderson:
45.

Marc Perry:
Guys… It’s funny, you talk about, “Hey, a guy in his 60s can move like guy in his 30s.” I’m like, you move you’re eight years old. It’s insane. People have gotta see it to believe it, it’s unbelievable, and… Continue, what were you gonna say?

[chuckle]

Tim Anderson:
I didn’t always. I move better now than I did in my 20s, and that is like… That’s undeniable. I wish I could have moved this well when I was in my 20s.

Marc Perry:
Right. I think it’s just so cool. And so, let’s talk a little bit about lifestyle tips, ’cause we’ve talked a little bit about the exercise, and I’m gonna include some more resources for people in the article, it’s just… By the way, the YouTube channel is amazing, but what is… Do you have any lifestyle tips to help guys kind of improve their health, restore their health? ‘Cause obviously, that’s just such an important part of all of this.

Tim Anderson:
One would be, in your brain you just gotta know that you’re made to be strong, your body is designed to be able and capable your whole life. You gotta know that. And if you look at it from, just from a distance, if a person lives to say 80, why would it make any sense that the best years of their life are zero to 20, and then the worst years of their life where everything starts falling apart are the next 60 years? That doesn’t make any sense, that’s not even meeting in the middle at the halfway point.

Marc Perry:
Right.

Tim Anderson:
So, beyond that, beyond mindset or just knowing that you’re designed to move, would be move, show up every day and it doesn’t have to be hard, it can just be checking in with yourself, make sure you’re breathing well, the way you’re designed; it can be literally 10 minutes a day, moving your head, rolling around on the floor, rocking back and forth and crawling on your hands and knees. It might be all you ever need to do to ensure that your body can move well. But you know what? The truth is, is 10 minutes is so ridiculously easy, you might… It’s okay if you do more, but if you keep… If that’s all you did, you’re gonna be good, okay, but if you made an intentional effort to move often throughout the day, again, whether it’s every hour, you get up from your desk and intentionally walk down the hall or go get a glass of water, go to the bathroom, you’re just deliberate on moving often, it all adds up. I think you just gotta show up and just know that your body is made to be strong. None of us are made to be weak. And if you know that, you’re on the right path.

Marc Perry:
Cool. And so, just out of curiosity, what does your own kind of morning routine look like?

Tim Anderson:
So I get up… This season, I get up at 4 AM and I read for about an hour. And then at five, I start rolling around on the… I do my 21s, and they take about, I don’t know, about 20 to 30 minutes, and it’s mostly rolling around on the floor, rocking back and forth. And then I’ll do, a couple of times a week, I’ll do Hindu squats, Hindu push-ups, and then I’ll go downstairs and I’ll grab a… I do have kettle bells and I use them to carry out in the neighborhood. So I’ll just pick up… For 10 minutes on the clock, I’ll just set a timer and I’ll just carry a kettle bell, back and forth across my cul-de-sac, holding it in different places because that’s great strength training, it’s old man strength training, you’re just using your body carrying stuff. And then after that, I’ll go for about a 30-minute walk in the neighborhood. The rest of the day, every hour or so, I might do, currently, I might do a handstand against the wall for 30 seconds or a back bridge or squats, or I’ll just lay down on the floor and get up 10 times, just practice and see where I can move. I just play.

Marc Perry:
Cool.

Tim Anderson:
I just play, nothing crazy.

Marc Perry:
And so in terms of doing it throughout the day being more mobile, is it like just when you need to… How would you recommend implementing that, or how do you recommend people move more? I think as a society, we’re all getting more and more sedentary, so to speak, like how do we build that in, how do we move more?

Tim Anderson:
Lowest hanging fruit would be to be intentional in setting a schedule that you have at least one movement block in the day. And for most people, because once the day gets started, the day takes… They get carried away with the day. If you don’t know it before your day, it just typically seems to be harder. Some people do throughout in the afternoon, but there are all these excuses can mount up in the afternoon, not to move. So lowest hanging fruit would just be intentional, set your small schedule, maybe you just move for 20-30 minutes, great, great, more intentional, if you really, really wanna make sure that you stay young and able and mentally thriving throughout your life, you just… If you’re working, in the COVID world and you’re working from home, it’s way easier, you can take those… You can take those movement breaks, you can deliberately not have water at your desk, and every time you get thirsty, you get up, walk across that house, go to the kitchen and get it, and then come back to your desk. Or you just take a 30-second rocking break where you just get on your hands and knees, rock back and forth, or you do some windshield wipers and just loosen up your spine, it feels amazing.

Even if you only got up and did a big stretch, like a lion would when they get up from sleeping in the day, your body will love it and you’re telling your body something, “Hey, I wanna keep you, I wanna use you, I’m just gonna stretch you a little bit.” And it’s gonna allow you to continue to have function. So every 30 minutes to an hour, it doesn’t have to be hard. You can just… And you can… The easiest way is just set a stopwatch that goes off every hour and you get up for… And do something for three minutes. We’re not talking about taking a 15-minute siesta or anything, it’s just three minutes of movement and then go back to work.

Marc Perry:
That’s really powerful. And out of curiosity, what is your eating like?

[chuckle]

Tim Anderson:
You don’t wanna know that one.

Marc Perry:
Uh-oh.

[chuckle]

Tim Anderson:
I’ve had a lot of… So, COVID taught me a lot of things. There are just a lot of uncertainties in life, and I’m very loose on my eating. When I say loose, I mean I don’t think there’s anything wrong with enjoying food. As a matter of fact, I think the secret to that is just to be grateful for it. So I practice… My goal, my hope is that I approach a meal with gratitude and I trust that it’s going to end up where it needs to go. So, in the past, I would be, well, is it organic? Is it grass fed? Has it been treated well? Which is important, those things could be important. But you know what, at the end of the day, sometimes you just can’t help how your food is treated and sometimes you just… You have what you have. So I try to be grateful for it and enjoy it. I have taste buds, I think I have them for a reason, so I like things that taste good. I’ll be honest right now, I’m on a big cereal kick, I love eating cereal.

[chuckle]

Marc Perry:
Okay.

Tim Anderson:
But it brings me joy, and I cannot see… I haven’t experienced anything negative from it.

Marc Perry:
Nice one. You’re in impressive shape. And could you… Is it cool? Could you kinda share maybe like a breakfast, lunch, dinner? Do you eat snacks? Just kind of curious.

Tim Anderson:
Breakfast is, I’ll eat a banana with peanut butter, those two things go… So for me, I just love taking, just spooning peanut butter on a banana. And then I might make pancakes or eat a bowl of cereal. And then for… If I eat around nine or 10, I probably won’t eat again until dinner. And then for dinner, a salad, meat or eggs, nothing crazy. On the weekends, I may have pizza. I like sushi. So my evening meals would be very healthy-esque looking, but my breakfast is, “He’s just eating banana, peanut butter and cereal or something.”

[chuckle]

Marc Perry:
Alright, hey, I think it’s great that you have that balance and it’s like… You’re also incredibly in tune with your body. I can imagine someone else, if they have pizza, they might have… It might not have the same effect on their body as it does you, I imagine.

Tim Anderson:
Well, and now here’s where we get crazy, so the mindset thing…

Marc Perry:
Right.

Tim Anderson:
If I go into a meal thinking that’s gonna be bad for me, I shouldn’t eat that and I’m already guilty before I eat it, I’m better off not eating it…

Marc Perry:
Interesting.

Tim Anderson:
Because what I’ve done is I’ve taken my nervous system and put it in fight or flight mode. Well, it’s not gonna be able to digest whatever I’m eating anyway, because now I’ve already laced it, I’ve wrapped it in negativity, I’ve made my nervous system feel unsafe about it, because it’s all information, so my thoughts are information. But if I approach a meal thinking, “Man, I’m grateful for this. This is gonna be good, I’m really gonna enjoy this, and it’s not gonna hurt me, it’s gonna help me.” So if I go into it with that mindset, now I’ve wrapped it in positivity and the nervous system knows. So, now… But if I’m in parasympathetic mode, I can rest, I can digest or I can get rid of inflammation that bad food might cause, if it’s not bad to me.

Marc Perry:
So, sometimes… And this is crazy, I know, but sometimes we set ourselves up for the expectation and the outcome based upon how we go into it. And our beliefs, our beliefs are strong, and our body responds because the body follows the head. And I’m not saying… I know it sounds crazy, but you could test it, you could test it out and see how your body does with it, and then you know for yourself. ‘Cause again, it’s the experience that teaches us. But if I’m not afraid or I don’t have guilt or shame, or if I’m not already beating myself up or beating myself up afterwards. So say you eat a meal and then you feel extremely guilty, what are you doing to your nervous system? What are you doing to your digestive system? Your vagus nerve is like, “Oh gosh, what? Oh, fight or flight. Let’s fight. Let’s fight. Let’s fight.” You can’t get any of the nutrition out of it, but if you ate a cookie with joy and gratitude and there was no concern in your nervous system whatsoever, could that cookie be used for something beneficial? Possibly.

Marc Perry:
That’s really powerful stuff, Tim. And so, we’re getting up on the 45 minutes here. And again, this is really powerful stuff and I’m so excited to share this with guys out there and ladies who are listening as well, to help shift I think, the mindset that a lot of guys have with fitness and exercise, and say, “Dude, you gotta push yourself, you gotta push yourself.” Whereas this is a whole different angle and perspective, and clearly what you’re doing is working. And so with all that said, how can people follow you and learn more about you?

Tim Anderson:
So I do have the YouTube page where it’s tons of free videos on just… On how to move, and not necessarily how to move but fun ways to move, that may be very beneficial for your body. We have a website called originalstrength.net, and that’s where we have articles and videos, also. And if you’re… And we also offer education courses and content. The easiest place like if you really wanna know more about how Pressing Reset works, if you go to Amazon, I’ve got several books, but the Pressing Reset, Original Strength Pressing Reset Reloaded, or… The Pressing Reset book.

Marc Perry:
Okay, okay. Yeah, you’ve got a bunch of books by the way. I have seen the Amazon page.

[chuckle]

Tim Anderson:
I get so confused.

[chuckle]

Marc Perry:
That’s all good.

[chuckle]

Tim Anderson:
But that one will definitely fill in all the gaps on why these child-like movements, how they can help your body, even if you’re 80. That, and to me, that’s where the power comes in, is the movement. All my crazy thoughts about nutrition or whatever, you don’t have to worry about those. But if you just wanna know how your body is designed to move, the books are a great place to start.

Marc Perry:
Awesome. Well, Tim, man, I really, really appreciate you sharing all this information. I’m excited and I think it’s gonna help a lot of people out. So with that said, man, enjoy the rest of the day. I really appreciate it.

Tim Anderson: Marc, thank you for having me. This has really been a lot of fun.

 

]]>
Thu, 12 Nov 2020 00:53:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/14/builtlean-podcast-how-to-restore-your-childhood-mobility/ jill@originalstrength.net (Jill Greene)
Advice to a Younger Self https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/09/advice-for-timmy/ Recently, a YouTube viewer asked me if there was any advice or tips about life I wished I knew as I was entering my thirties. I thought about it a bit, and this is what I came up with. The truth is, this is advice I wish I could remember and practice today, well into my forties. Anyway, If I could travel back to meet younger Timmy, this is what I would tell him...

 

  • You are not what you do, for a living, or as a hobby. 

 

  • It doesn’t matter how much weight you can lift, no one cares.

 

  • Glory is an illusion, it’s gone faster than it comes.

 

  • Don’t make exercise an idol. It won’t save you and it can’t. 

 

  • Savor your time with your kids. 

 

  • Forgive yourself - every single time.

 

  • Whatever it is, ask yourself if it is worth it? 

 

  • Don’t be an ass. It’s a choice. 

 

  • Be happy. It’s also a choice. 

 

  • This will pass, you can heal. You will heal.

 

  • You have a purpose. Discover what it is.

 

  • Ask anything. Questions open the door for wisdom. 

 

  • Don’t be afraid of opinions or the future. Don’t be afraid of anything. It’s a trap.

 

  • Learn the freedom and the adventure of taking an authentic breath. 

 

  • Smile more.

 

  • Trust God. Trust the Universe. Trust. 

 

  • You are enough. In all situations. In all possibilities. You. Are. Enough.  

 

Like I said, there are days when I would do well to remember some of these things. Forty-five-year-old Timmy trips over different things than Thirty-year-old Timmy, but still there are bits of timeless advice Today’s Timmy would do well remember and practice. There may be a few tidbits in here for you, too. 

 

Thanks for asking the question and if anyone else has a question, please comment below or email heyguys@originalstrength.net.  

]]>
Mon, 09 Nov 2020 04:03:46 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/09/advice-for-timmy/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
Chris Bordoni Podcast - Episode #16 - We're Designed To Be Superheros https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/04/chris-bordoni-podcast-episode-16-were-designed-to-be-superheros/ Episode #16 - We're designed to be Superheros

100 Inspiring Voices | Episode 16 | Tim Anderson

Overview

Tim Anderson is an educator, personal trainer, and the founder of Original Strength, a movement to help people remember how to move well and live better lives. In a nutshell, his job is to help people feel amazing.

In this conversation, I speak with Tim about the origins of Original Strength, how it’s changed my life, the joy of doing strange things in public, and what it’s like to unintentionally start a global movement.

We also talk about some of Tim’s favorite sayings, including “It feels good to feel good,” “Start where you are,” and “Be your own chef.”

Highlights

3:15 – “Original Strength is the idea that your body is designed to move. And more than that, that your body is designed to be strong throughout your entire life.”

3:30 – “You’re not supposed to have a peak of good health and vitality around 20 and then decline from 20 to 70. That’s not supposed to be the case.”

5:00 – “In your nervous system, there is a program of health and vitality. There is not a program of breakdown.”

5:45 – “The road to Wrongville is probably wider than we think.”

7:30 – “If you have a certain belief system that’s negative, your body will actually help you express that negativity… your body actually follows your thought patterns.”

8:45 – “It took time for me to see the miracles happening in front of my face.”

10:30 – “If they discover in two minutes that a knee that has hurt for 20 years doesn’t hurt anymore, that creates an opportunity for a mindshift in thinking.”

11:30 – “The five resets are breathing properly with your diaphragm, activating your vestibular system through head control… rolling… rocking back and forth… and engaging in your gait pattern.”

12:05 – “Literally, [the five resets] are like pressing a reset button on the nervous system that makes the original operating program reset itself – and get rid of the junk – so that it runs the way it’s supposed to.”

18:05 – “Even at 78, if you think the best years of your life are over, you can start there, and literally shift your paradigm to explore and discover the best years of your life to come. It’s amazing.”

18:45 – “If you can find one good breath, you are one breath better off than you were before.”

20:00 – “How I see things has greatly changed… somewhere along the line I saw that there is no bad, there is no wrong. We don’t need to judge things, we just need to accept things.

20:30 – “We start from good, and we just take whatever a person can give us, teach them how to take what they’re doing well and make it a little bit better.”

21:45 – “We are creative, and part of the beauty of life is creation.”

26:15 – “I grew up a people pleaser… but, if we go around not doing things because we’re concerned how we might look to others, we’re putting ourselves in a prison. We’re not giving ourselves the freedom to explore our own selves and to be ourselves.”

32:15 – “Honestly, it feels like a weird dream… I wasn’t setting out to do anything other than quit hurting… Out of frustration, I asked God to show me how to train to be bulletproof.”

33:00 – “I got so enamored with what I was learning that I wanted to share it with people.”

40:45 – “We’re all designed to be superheroes.”

41:45 – “We all need some type of motivational anchor every now and then that we can glance at to pick us back up.”

Resources

Get in touch

Thanks so much for listening!

]]>
Wed, 04 Nov 2020 16:48:13 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/04/chris-bordoni-podcast-episode-16-were-designed-to-be-superheros/ jill@originalstrength.net (Jill Greene)
To Be Fearfully Made https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/02/to-be-fearfully-made/ A friend of mine recently asked me what I thought the word “fearfully” meant. She was thinking about the phrase “I am fearfully and wonderfully made.” I thought it was a great question because to be honest, I tripped over this question about 10 years ago and decided it meant awesomely. If you’ve ever attended one of our courses, or read one of my books, you may have seen this as our tag line: “I am awesomely and wonderfully made.”

 

I replaced fearfully with awesomely because In my heart, I knew fearfully couldn’t mean anything negative, it couldn’t mean fear. So I swapped it with what I thought must be the meaning: awesomely. When my friend asked this question the other day, I realized I may have been close, but I think I still missed the mark.   

 

So, what does it mean to be fearfully made? 

 

This is what I think, I think the author of the original phrase was enamored with both his Creator and his design. I also think he was expressing a depth of meaning in a language that the English language just can’t capture. 

 

“...I am fearfully and wonderfully made.” 

 

The author was smitten.

 

He goes on to say, “Marvelous are your works and this my soul knows very well.” 

 

I think the word “fearfully”, as it was used, is the English language’s attempt in trying to explain the dance of awe, beauty, holiness, power, and love. It’s almost beyond words and too great to describe. BUT, it is the absence of actual fear, it cannot mean anything to do with fear. It’s pure beauty, respect, awe, creativity, and wonder. It’s the joyful awareness of an unimaginable, marvelous work of art. 

 

The author is singing a song expressing his joy and appreciation of the beauty and wonder that he is. He knows he is The Work of Art. He knows this very well. 

 

And he’s right, and he should be joyful. He knows something powerful. 

 

Can you imagine the joy and excitement of realizing that you are amazing? What would life be like if you knew you were masterfully crafted, or miraculously designed, or thoroughly thought out from beginning to end. What if you knew you were fearfully made? Would you become smitten? Would you be enamored? 

 

The point is, the author knows something about himself and about creation that you should know: you are the dance of awe, beauty, holiness, power, respect, creativity, love, and wonder. You are a marvelous work of art. That’s the truth. Marinate on it and notice what your heart tells you. Let yourself be smitten by the wonder that you are.

 

After all, you are fearfully and wonderfully made.

 

Thank you, Nadine. 

]]>
Mon, 02 Nov 2020 02:29:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/11/02/to-be-fearfully-made/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
Get Up - A Lot! https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/26/get-up!/ You’ve probably heard that you can’t out exercise a bad diet. Well, what may be more accurate than that is that you can’t out exercise an unhealthy lifestyle. I know that sounds like a paradox. 

 

“If I exercise, can I have an unhealthy lifestyle?” 

 

Well, yeah. 

 

What is an unhealthy lifestyle? I guess it could be a buffet of things including activity levels, to eating habits, to thought patterns, to hygiene.

 

But for today, and for the rest of your life, let’s look at a sedentary lifestyle as an unhealthy lifestyle. 

 

I recently got to talk with Dr. Joan Vernikos. She is the former Director of NASA’s Life Science division. She has conducted tons of research on the aging effects of being in Space. In Zero Gravity, the human body ages 10 times faster than it normally would. While at NASA, Dr. Vernikos also discovered that being sedentary, in bed or a chair, had the same effects on the body as being in Space. In other words, her research found that what ages the body is not moving: living in chairs. 

 

She also found that exercise does very little to stop the aging process IF a person continues on to live a sedentary lifestyle. For example, an hour of exercise cannot overcome or reverse the consequences of 8 hours in a chair. 

 

The reason for this is that the body is designed to move - a lot.

 

Dr. Vernikos says sitting still or lying in bed for hours is like silence to the nervous system, it’s just like being in Zero Gravity. With that silence, there is no vestibular system stimulation, there is no use, no demand, no ask placed on the body. And so, it ages at a more rapid rate. Blood vessels lose their elasticity, triglycerides elevate, inflammation builds, reflexes deteriorate, coordination fades, balance goes away, joints degrade, etc. 

 

BUT, all of this can be reversed or prevented with simply moving often throughout the day. Dr. Vernikos ran experiments and found that simply getting up from a chair every 30 minutes prevented and reversed the long lasting effects of aging. Remember, exercising did not do this. 

Shockingly, she also discovered that simply getting up often reversed the aging process better than walking did. That’s not to say walking wasn’t beneficial, but that something “easier,” like just standing often (getting up from a chair and stimulating the vestibular system) was just as effective as going for a walk in preventing and reversing aging. 

 

It’s about moving often. It’s not about standing. Standing for long periods of time also creates a type of silence, it’s static and it still has deteriorating effects. It’s about activating the vestibular system, changing postures, often to make some “noise” in the vestibular system to let the nervous system know it is needed. 

 

If you ask the body for something, it will give you what you want. Moving often is asking the body to have the ability to always be able to move. If you don’t ask the body for anything it will give you that, too. 

 

You’re body is designed to last a lifetime with good health, and you are meant to enjoy all your years. One of the easiest ways you can help ensure you can always enjoy your body is to move often. That means if you sit a lot, take two to three minute standing breaks every thirty minutes, or even every sixty minutes. Let your body know you want to keep it by moving often. You don’t just have to get up and stand, you can also be creative and let your joy come out. Get up and dance, go for a walk, stretch and smile (feels AH-mazing), go for a 10 step crawl, shoot Nerf Basketball in your office for 2 minutes, etc. 

 

The point is, a sedentary lifestyle is an unhealthy lifestyle. It ages you and robs you of your ability to live your life well. But you can choose to be healthy and live your life well, with joy, by simply moving often throughout the day. It can be as simple as standing up, taking a reaching stretch and smiling for a minute or so, every 30 to 60 minutes. 

 

Yes, it is crazy enough to work. 

 

Are you adventurous enough to try it? 

]]>
Mon, 26 Oct 2020 01:58:13 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/26/get-up!/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
We are like bubbles. https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/19/what-are-we-doing/ If I’ve ever met you, there’s a good chance you made me smile. And maybe you didn’t, but I know you could if you wanted to. If you’ve ever met me, I hope I made you smile, even if only a little bit. I’ll bet, if we could make each other smile, we could be friends.

 

You know what, maybe we are friends. Sure, we have our differences, but we also have a great deal in common. What we have in common, even if it’s only a few things, is strong enough to make us friends. 

 

So, since you’re my friend, I need to let you know some things about me. After all, you should know your friend. So here goes: 

 

I don’t care what political party you are registered under and I don’t care who you want to vote for. Maybe we will vote the same way, maybe we won’t, that doesn’t matter to me. You matter. Your party, your candidate - even if I disagree with you, I still like you. You haven’t lost my respect because we may differ. You’re my friend. 

 

You may think I’m scared if I wear a mask. You may think I don’t understand science. You may think I don’t understand faith. That’s okay. You may not know what’s going on in “my world.” I may not know what’s going on in your world, either. I may see you driving alone in your car while you wear a mask. It’s your car, it’s your mask. You need to do what you think you need to do. I don’t pity you, I’m not better than you. I’m your friend. 

 

Maybe you’re taller than me. Maybe I’m pale and you’re not. Maybe I talk funny next to you. Maybe you like Keith Sweat and  I like George Michaels. Maybe you’re a vegan and maybe I’m an Egg McMuffin. Maybe you like Buddha, maybe I’m fond of Jesus. Maybe you believe in astral planes and maybe I believe in the micro-cosmos. Maybe you’re in the Microsoft Gate and maybe I’ve been Mac-notized. 

 

Isn’t it great that we can respect each other even if we disagree, or have different beliefs, or we do different things, or we look different? Isn’t it great that we can be so different and still see in each other and still listen to each other? After all, we are friends.

 

At least we should be. 

 

We have so much in common. We both want to be happy. We both want to be loved. We both want to be respected. We both want to be heard. We both want to be seen. We both want to be...

 

And why can’t we be? 

 

After all, we come from the same place. The same source of life is in us both. We breathe the same air. We live in the same place. Why should we be divided by our differences when on the inside, we are much the same? 

 

Think about it. We are like bubbles.

 

What makes bubbles “neat” is their size, their shape, the ways they float, the ways that combine, etc... What makes bubbles beautiful is the way they reflect the light, the way their colors swirl and dance and the way they sparkle. They have the same air and their beauty is revealed by the same light.

 

And that’s us, we are like bubbles.

 

But bubbles, as you know, are fragile and they are only here for a short while. Soon, they pop. And when they pop, their beauty disappears, even though the same source that filled them is still there. 

 

Anyway, as your friend, I just wanted you to know me a little better. I don’t want our differences to get in the way of our friendship. Besides, this life is so short and our bubbles won’t last forever. They’ll pop one day, and the source that filled them will join itself again. 

 

But until then, while we are here, we should be friends. Let’s see in one another, listen to one another, honor each other, and respect the life that fills us both. If we can’t do that, what are we doing here? 

 

 

This article was previously released on TimmyAnderson.net.

 

 

]]>
Mon, 19 Oct 2020 02:30:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/19/what-are-we-doing/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)
Warning: Viewer Discretion is Advised https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/11/warning-viewer-discretion-is-advised/ Warning: The following film contains scenes that some viewers may find disturbing. Viewer discretion is advised. 

 

Do you ever pay attention to the warnings that play before movies? If you’re a parent you probably do. If you’re a “Tim,” you might consider the warnings if you want to protect your mind or you don’t want to give yourself dreams of things you’d rather not dream about. 

 

The warnings that appear before films are for our protection. They “warn” us of things we may not want to be exposed to. After the warning, we choose what we let into our eyes, our ears, our minds, and our hearts. Sometimes we choose wisely. Sometimes we choose foolishly. No matter what we choose, there is always a consequence of some type. 

 

We are well advised to head warnings before films. They give us the opportunity to decide what we let into our hearts. Sadly, the news and social media does not typically come with such warnings...although when it does, you are usually better off not watching the violence and the hurt. Sometimes it’s better to hear it than to have the image stuck in your head. 

 

It’s good that movies in theaters and on TVs come with warnings. It gives us a chance to choose. Unfortunately, the most important films that we watch have no warnings and we rarely think about choosing whether or not to watch them. I’m talking about the films we play in our mind with our imagination. 

 

Every day, for most of us, most of the day, we play films, or stories, in our heads. We imagine horrible things, dreadful things, worrisome things, fearful things, and anger inducing things. We create stories of things that haven’t happened or we twist stories of things that have happened and we binge watch them all day, day after day. No warnings, full send, we are all in to the stories we see in our head. And as a result, it makes us miserable, it causes suffering, and it puts us in hell. 

 

Now, to be sure, there are some of us who play positive movies in their heads. They dream of lovely things, successful things, beautiful things, and courageous things. These people, whether they know it or not, are geniuses. They are typically happy and the navigate the world quite well, even in the midst of chaos. 

 

You know this. I know this. But sometimes, sometimes I play bad stories in my head. I don’t mean to, but I run with it once they start playing. And, unfortunately I get what I play. You likely do too. Yet, when I play good stories, when I imagine beautiful, successful, loving scenarios, I reap that reward as well. I have learned I can manifest what I focus on or “dream up.” The mind is that powerful. What I have not learned is that I need to heed what I focus on or dream up. I need to choose what I watch, and what I focus on. 

 

You do, too.

 

The stories we play in our heads are the ones we keep in our hearts. These are the stories that are far more consequential than the ones we watch at the theaters or even the ones we see on the news. Our stories, the ones inside of us, are the ones that come out of us. We create what we hold onto in our hearts. 

 

If we hold fear and worry, we will certainly have it. If we hold love and kindness, we can certainly give it. If we hold anger and hatred, we can’t help but express it, notice it, feed off it, and be consumed by it. If we hold anything, ANYTHING that is not a story of love, success, beauty or kindness in our hearts, we will put ourselves in the hell we have created. 

 

This is a lesson I’ve learned and one I hope to flip upside down so that I can put myself in “the Kingdom of Heaven.” That’s where I belong. That’s where you belong.

 

Set your mind and story mode on positive things like love and kindness. If you catch yourself dwelling on worry, or fear, or anger, stop playing that imaginary, change the movie.

 

Yes, guard your eyes and ears from what you see and hear, but most importantly guard your heart and your life from what you dwell on and rehearse. You can create and have anything you dwell on. So to be happy and to enjoy your life, dwell on positive, lovely things. The consequences for how we think and what we hold in our heart are too powerful to ignore. 

 

What we meditate on affects everything: How we feel. How we move. How we think. How we live. 

 

Wisely choose the stories and films you play in your head.

 

“Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable - if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy - meditate on these things.” Philippians 4:8

 

Another inverse way of saying this is, “Warning, viewer discretion is advised.”

]]>
Sun, 11 Oct 2020 04:24:00 +0000 https://originalstrength.net/blog/2020/10/11/warning-viewer-discretion-is-advised/ tim@originalstrength.net (Tim Anderson)